16 11, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Kendall Square Association to Become Co-Sponsoring Partner

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:30+00:00 November 16th, 2012|Customization Trends, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01The closer we get to this year's Smart Customization Seminar the more exciting news drop in from our team organizing the event. And the one we have today is really amazing: Kendall Square Association, the non-profit group working tirelessly to improve Kendall Square, where the MIT campus is located, for all residing entities, has agreed to co-sponsor the event and help to promote it amongst their members to get even more customization enthusiasts to participate in the seminar. We are really grateful for this tremendous support! 

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

15 11, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Meet the Speakers: Marvin Minsky

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:33+00:00 November 15th, 2012|Customization Trends, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Continuing our little mini series on speakers ofthis year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar, here is some more information on who will be there on stage to share his expert knowledge with you.






MinskyMarvin Minsky

Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, MIT
Professor of E.E.C.S., MIT 

Personal Website

Marvin Minsky has made many contributions
to AI, cognitive psychology, mathematics, computational linguistics, robotics,
and optics. In recent years he has worked chiefly on imparting to machines the
human capacity for commonsense reasoning. 

His conception of human intellectual
structure and function is presented in two books: The Emotion Machine and The
Society of Mind (which is also the title of the course he teaches at MIT). He
received the BA and PhD in mathematics at Harvard (1950) and Princeton (1954).

In 1951 he built the SNARC, the first neural network simulator. His other
inventions include mechanical arms, hands and other robotic devices, the
Confocal Scanning Microscope, the "Muse" synthesizer for musical
variations (with E. Fredkin), and one of the first LOGO "turtles".

A
professor with MIT’s Media Lab and AI Lab, he is a member of the NAS, NAE and
Argentine NAS. In addition, he has received the ACM Turing Award, the MIT
Killian Award, the Japan Prize, the IJCAI Research Excellence Award, the Rank
Prize and the Robert Wood Prize for Optoelectronics, and the Benjamin Franklin
Medal.

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

14 11, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Additional Keynote by Marco Mattiacci, President & CEO of Ferrari North America!

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:35+00:00 November 14th, 2012|Customization Trends, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Truly great news! After we could already commit inernationally renown experts Joseph Pine and Alex Pentland to hold opening keynotes at this year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar, news just came in that we got another really exclusive speaker to share some insights with us!






MattiaciMarco Mattiacci

President & CEO of Ferrari North America

Linkedin

 

Marco Mattiacci was appointed Chief Executive Office of Ferrari North America, Inc. in January 2010. He oversees the largest market of Ferrari, which beyond the US included Canada and all Central and South America.

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

12 11, 2012

[Market Watch] Open Runway: A Women’s Customization Paradise

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:40+00:00 November 12th, 2012|Cases-Consumer, Clothing, Design, Footwear, Personalization|

Open Runway #logoCertainly, vendors offering individualized shoes and handbags are not a truly new concept. But some do it better than others, at the very least in terms of configurator-usability.

One such example is Open Runway, a company founded by Monika Desai, one of the strong members of the Boston mass customization community.  Open Runway lets you crate individual shoes (soon) and handbags (now) and have them manufactured from scratch.

The web-interface is, as said, really convinient to use. You pick one of several base models, represented as silhouettes, decide which material and color individual parts such as heels, trims, straps etc should be in and see the results of your decisions in realtime on your screen.

As you can tell from the two images below, the process of designing is fairly simple even for men. Manufacturing time is announced to be 8 weeks, but if you have the chance to get the shoe or handbag, you have always wanted, what is two more months? (even if we know from our research that a delivery time of two weeks really improves the turnover rate .. so here is room for improvement for Monika).

Open Runway Shoe
Open Runway Bag

More about Open Runway on their website. I am curious to see how this develops and fits into teh recent trend of strong investments into custom fashion sites.

12 11, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Meet the Speakers: Kaustuv De Bisvas

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:44+00:00 November 12th, 2012|Crowdsourcing, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Continuing our little mini series on speakers ofthis year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar, here is some more information on who will be there on stage to share his expert knowledge with you.





DebiswasKaustuv De Bisvas

Co-Founder & CEO / Sunglass.io
TED Fellow

Personal Website

Kaustuv De Biswas is a TED Fellow (2011) and Co-founder/CEO at Sunglass.io, a cloud based 3D design platform to collect and deliver micro-innovations through a low barrier and ubiquitous channel for designers across the globe.

His core expertise is in design computation and his PhD dissertation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigates computational frameworks for large distributed systems and the economics of collaboration.

Leveraging his expertise in technology, Kaustuv has previously been a consultant/advisor to several international architectural practices, and has been a research associate at Bentley Systems.

Kaustuv has also taught numerous workshops and seminars in leading universities/schools such as MIT, Harvard, Architectural Association (London), Columbia, and Georgia Tech introducing advanced computational techniques.

 

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

9 11, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Meet the Speakers: Jarmo Suominen

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:47+00:00 November 9th, 2012|Crowdsourcing, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Following up on our last preview post in which we already geve away details about the keynote speakers ofthis year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar, here is some more information on who will be there on stage to share his expert knowledge with you.



SuominenJarmo Suominen

Professor of Mass Customization / Aalto University Helsinki
Director of Future Home Institute  / Aalto University Helsink

Personal Website

 

Jarmo Suominen conducts Mass Customization
research at the Aalto University A! (the former University of Art &
Design), Helsinki, where he is a professor and the director of Future Home
Research Institute. 

He is studying the
engagement process and customer behavior within the interaction with
high-interest and high-involvements products and goods.  By addressing the existing research paradigm
from activity theory to behavioral sciences and product concept creation methodologies,
Professor Suominen also develops further current design paradigms in
architecture.

In addition to his position at Aalto University, he is the owner
of Suominen Architect and has won numerous prizes in architectural competitions
in Finland an in Europe.

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

5 11, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Meet the Speakers: Eric von Hippel

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:50+00:00 November 5th, 2012|Crowdsourcing, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Following up on our last preview post in which we already geve away details about the keynote speakers ofthis year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar, here is some more information on who will be there on stage to share his expert knowledge with you.


VhippelEric von Hippel

Professor of Technological Innovation in the MIT Sloan School of Management, Professor in MIT's Engineering Systems Division.

Personal Website

 

Eric von Hippel is a Professor
of Management of Innovation and Engineering Systems at the MIT Sloan School of
Management.

His research discovers and explores patterns in the sources of
innovation and develops new processes to improve the “fuzzy front end” of the
innovation process—the end where ideas for breakthrough new products and
services are developed.

He is currently leading a major research project to
discover how these user innovation communities work, and how and whether the
same principles might extend to many areas of product and service development.

In addition, von Hippel is working with governmental and academic colleagues in
the Netherlands, Denmark, and the United Kingdom to develop new and modified
governmental policies appropriate to the newly emerging innovation paradigm of
user-centered innovation.

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

5 11, 2012

Lumographics: 3D Configurators in Mass Customization [Interview]

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:54+00:00 November 5th, 2012|Design, Interview, Personalization, Technologies & Enablers, Virtual Models|

LumologoSeeing is believing. This old yet certainly often correct phrase describes one of the phenomena of human psychology: No matter how great your product is, no matter how well you describe it in text, one subpar image can ruin the entire impression and make your would-be customer decide against the purchase.

This is especially true when it comes to products for which buying decision is mainly based on aesthetics. Customers usually (more or less) instantly recognize what they like but are often bad at describing it with words – or transforming a product description into a mental picture of the product.

Mass customized products add to this by putting the "burden" of design into the customers hands, enabling him to decide which combination of design factors looks best – and, forcing him to do so.

 3D visualizations as part of a configurator is one option companies have to make life a bit easier for their clients and increase chances to sell a product. Well visulized products give an instant idea of what one will gain for his money and how it will change with different options selected. As with most configurator-related things, though: If it is being done the right way.

Since 3D modeling and the required software coding is certainly not easy, seeking professional help is usually a good idea. One such company to assist mass customization ventures in presenting their products in the right light is LumoGraphics.

Being in the business of professional-grade 3D configuration systems since 1998, the German company works for industry mayors such as Mercedes-Benz, helping them to visualize their line of buses in full 3D.

Marc HerlingMarc Herling, CEO of LumoGraphics and speaker at the MC2012 conference in June, was kind enough to answer some of our questions about 3D modeling as a service, as a business model, as an enabler and how mass customization companies can profit from it.

FTP: Marc, your company Lumo Graphics offers
completely individualized 3D products visualization, which is a good example
for service customization. What kinds of services and products do you
offer and how far can they be individualized to each client of yours?

MH: Lumo
Graphics offers solutions for 3D visualization and configuration based on our
standard platform LumoLogic. With LumoLogic users can combine their complex
product structure and variants with the configuration logic and a real-time 3D visualization.
Besides the services for project management and support Lumo Graphics also
offers additional tools like LumoLogic DataPreparator for process integration
and LumoVis as a 3D visualization engine.

FTP: Can you tell a bit about what you have in store
for companies?

MH: Lumo
Graphics works for a lot of customers especially in the complex B2B area. They
all like the integrated and complete solution of Lumo Graphics with 3D
visualization, configuration management and data integration. With Lumo
Graphics companies can avoid failures in the implementation of a 3D
configurator, because of our one stop shopping approach.

FTP: In your presentation at the MC2012 you used the
term YGWYW (You Get What You Want), as an evolvement of the classical WYSIWYG
(What You see Is What You Get). Can you tell more about how 3D imagery changes
the product/buying experience for shoppers when using online configurators?

MH: It is
widely known that seeing is believing. We also quite often talk about that an
image is worth more than 1000 words. So if a customer decides for a complex and
often expensive product he needs a qualitative decision support that is given
by 3D visualization. Products are not only being sold by a rational decision
process but quite often by an emotional aspect, especially in aesthetical
design decisions. 3D visualization also helps customers to understand the
overall possibilities of a product and its variants. So at the end the customer
will get a compelling impression of its own product and forces a correct and a
comprehensible decision.

FTP: Getting a really professional 3D visualization
is most likely more expensive than having a photographer shooting my products.
For which companies do you think these additional costs are outweighing by the
added value of 3D imagination? In other words: For whom are the costs worth it?

MH: If a
company sells products with no or only limited variants than it may be cheaper
to hire a photograph. But in a case that your products have a lot of variants
then it is impossible for a photographer to cover all of them in a given
timeframe and budget. And you always need to wait until the product exists. With
software like that of Lumo Graphics you will be able to manage thousands of
variants and their graphical representation quite easily.

FTP: Do you think 3D product demonstration is
especially suited for MC companies because of the fact that consumers (=
non-professional designers) are integrated into the product design process?

MH: Absolutely.
You have millions of possibilities for a 3D visualization especially in e-commerce.
MC companies need to have a graphical representation of their products because
it makes the customers decision so much easier. Why? In Mass customization the
customers always have a fear of a wrong decision because the product does not
exist before he orders it. So he does not know if it will work (Functional failures)
and if it will look like he is expecting (Aesthetical failures). So the 3D
visualization  assists the customer in his
decision process.

FTP: Can you tell more about the (emotional)
importance of presenting the consumer a more realistic image of what he’s going
to buy?

MH: Think about
dating sites or Facebook. Why does every user of these sites choose an
excellent or a funny picture? The eye believes realistic pictures. And the
pictures create involvement. It’s the same with product visualization. I want
to buy the best looking and working product. If the visualization of a product is
nearly perfect the involvement goes up!

FTP: Do you have figures or specific customer
feedback on how implementing 3D visualizations improved sales or customer
loyalty?

MH: Franz Rapp,
Designer of Mercedes-Benz Buses told us: "We introduced the 3D interior
configurator in order to give our customers reliable support in making
decisions about our highly complex products. After well over 1000 successful
consultations, we have demonstrated that we're right on track with Lumo
Graphics".

Other
customers told us that they reduced the failure rate and the cost of change by
more than 20%.

FTP: How does cooperating with you work in practice?

MH: As I said
before we are a solution company. So if a company identifies the need for 3D visualization
we advise them based on our expertise and technology. After the decision for an
implementation we need to find and prepare the product data (geometries,
dependencies, and so on). In that step we also generate the 3D models and
visualizations of all products parts. After that we install LumoLogic and build
the rules for the real-time visualization. If the customer uses a configuration
toolkit we integrate it. And of course we support the customer in all
questions.

FTP: Pretended I was a medium sized MC company
asking for assistance to set up a 3D configurator for my online store. Which
services/products would you recommend to me and how would the process evolve
from there?

MH: First of
all you need to ask what kind of value do you expect from using a 3D
configuration process. Will your product fit and do you have all the product
data? Just a simple example. Would mymuesli.com sell so much more by using a 3D
configurator?

If you
think and believe that the 3D configurator will help you to get more revenue or
to cut costs or to increase the efficiency of your processes, than we will
advise the customer based on our solutions. And we also talk about the
investment in Hard- and Software. If all checkings  generate a positive ROI than we will offer
the customer the LumoLogic and LumoVis products.

FTP: How easy is it to maintain a 3D configurator in
my online store?

MH: The main
part in maintaining a 3D configurator is the administration of the product
logic. So do I need to stay flexible to change parts in the product database or
does it take long periods of time to get updated 3D models whenever I want to
change something?

With
LumoLogic we offer a very easy administration tool to combine product parts
with 3D images and configuration rules.

FTP: Can you talk about business figures at all, how
well-received are your services on the MC market?

MH: Depends on
your definition of the MC market. We have a strong position at B2B MC companies
that sell complex products. We don’t have such a strong position in the B2C
segment of the market. But with our strategy we grow approx. 40% per year in the
last years.

FTP: Do you have more traditional or mass
customization companies, and how is the trend there?

MH: We serve
nearly 100% traditional mass customization companies. By that we mean companies
that sell traditional products but with the mass customization approach. But quite
often they don’t name it Mass Customization.

FTP: Obviously most MC companies are still relying
on classical 2D images for their product presentation, while rendered 3D models
have been available since many years. Why, in your opinion, do they still
hesitate to change to the third dimension?

MH: 3D has
quite often not a good reputation because many people believe that it is
complicated and expensive. But with the enormous boost for the 3D technology in
the last years the use of 3D became very easy. And with the enormous boost in bandwidth
we believe that the usage of 3D models in marketing and sales is going to increase.

FTP: What do you think of mass customization in
general, will it be "just a trend" or become (one of) the major
retail models of the future?

MH: Mass
Customization is in the B2B Segment a huge part of the technical solution
concept to deliver technical and design variants, so it is not a trend it is
reality.

FTP: Having worked with MC companies before, which
advice do you want to give to them, especially in regards to the importance of
and proper setup of visual product presentation?

MH: Start small
with only one product or product line but work on the process. 3D visualizations
are only one part of the complete configuration process. The full configuration
of the product is represented in a configuration management tool. But also look
at a tool based administration for 3D visualization and use standard software.
Also have in mind that you want to sell across more than one channel. Use 3D
models for configuration and real-time visualization but CGI (computer
generated images) for printed offers. With that you will be prepared fort he 3D
configuration future.

FTP: Marc, thank you very much for these insights! I am looking forward to see more (MC) products being represented in a more realistic way, using professional 3D technology, in the future.

29 10, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Meet the Speakers: Edward S. Boyden

By | 2018-06-14T06:49:59+00:00 Oktober 29th, 2012|Crowdsourcing, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Following up on our last preview post in which we already geve away details about the keynote speakers ofthis year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar, here is some more information on who will be there on stage to share his expert knowledge with you.

Boyden2

Edward S. Boyden, Ph. D.

Benesse Career Development Professor of Research in Education

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

MIT Media Lab

 

 

Ed Boyden is the Benesse Career Development Professor, and associate
professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences, at
the MIT Media Lab and the MIT McGovern Institute, respectively.

He
leads the Synthetic Neurobiology group, which develops tools for
controlling and observing the dynamic circuits of the brain, and uses
these neurotechnologies to understand how cognition and emotion arise
from brain network operation, as well as to enable systematic repair of
intractable brain disorders.

He was named to the "Top 35 Innovators Under the Age of 35" by Technology Review in 2006, and to the "Top 20 Brains Under Age 40" by Discover
magazine in 2008. He has received the NIH Director's New Innovator
Award
, the Society for Neuroscience Research Award for Innovation in
Neuroscience
, the NSF CAREER Award, the Paul Allen Distinguished
Investigator Award
, and the New York Stem Cell Robertson Investigator
Award
. In 2010, his work was recognized as the "Method of the Year" by
the journal Nature Methods, and in 2011 he delivered a lecture on his lab's work at TED.

Boyden received his PhD in neurosciences from Stanford University as a
Hertz Fellow, where he discovered that the molecular mechanisms used to
store a memory are determined by the content to be learned. Before
that, he received three degrees in electrical engineering and physics
from MIT. He has contributed to over 250 peer-reviewed papers, current
or pending patents, and articles, and has given over 140 invited talks
on his work.

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

23 10, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Keynote Speakers

By | 2018-06-14T06:50:02+00:00 Oktober 23rd, 2012|Crowdsourcing, Events, MIT SCG, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 As promissed, here is some more information about this year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar. Today we can give details on  our esteemed keynote speakers, the well known Joseph B. Pine II and Alex Pentland.

B. Joseph Pine II, Strategic Horizons, LLP

Internationally acclaimed author, speaker and management adivser. A
visiting Scholar with the Design Lab at MIT, he co-founded Strategic
Horizons LLP to help businesses conceive and design new ways of adding
value to their economic offerings.

Alex "Sandy" Pentland, MIT Media Lab Human Dynamics Group

Professor Pentland is a pioneer in organizational engineering, mobile
information systems, and computational social science. Pentland's
research focus is on harnessing information flows and incentives within
social networks, the big data revolution, and converting this technology
into real-world ventures.

And of course there will be many more experts sharing their knowledge. Just stay tuned for more details over the next days!

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

23 10, 2012

[Interview] One Just One: Unique 3D Printed, Very Individual Jewelry by Generative Design

By | 2018-06-14T06:50:07+00:00 Oktober 23rd, 2012|Cases-Consumer, Customization Trends, MC/OI on the Web, Personalization|

Sivam Krish, one of the veterans of the mass customization movement, is back with a new venture, building on generative design. HIs idea: a new toolkit to customize individualized jewelry.

This is not a new category In the old days, wealthy people went to their jeweler of choice and ordered a piece of earrings or such, matching their individual taste. With the concept of mass customization, customized jewelery has become a bit more affordable and accessible to "the masses". Usually, customization in this sector happens by picking a base model (online) and then changing materials, gems, color and so on. A number of high-profile startups have been busy in this domain.

Now, there is a new approach on the market, though. One Just One has just published their new concept on kickstarter where they hope to raise some investment capital to make their ideas reality. 

Onejustone_productsThe idea sounds fairly interesting. Instead of altering a few numbers of typical base designs for a ring or a necklace, they apply a technology which they call gererative design to generate 3D printed jewelry which is as unique as possible: they only sell one piece of each variation. 

We were lucky to get Sivam Krish of One Just One to give us an online interview and tell more about the idea behind the venture and how it is different from the existing competition.

FTP: Sivam, can you give some general outline of what One Just One is, and why it stands out from competition?

SK: Ok, we are trying here to reverse the influenced of the industrial revolution – which commodotized products. Before that, ladies would go to a family jewellery and say I want something like that but made like this. The jewellery himself would have some prototype types in his mind. We call these prototypes genetic models – but they are computable models.

One of the great disadvantages in design is that there is no way to map design information except in terms of geometry color or texture. Genetic modeling allow us to map products parametrically – which then means we can map at a very high level as what people desire, so it is going to open up new possibilities.

We should be able to do
what amazon does with books, in terms of not only what customers are likely to
like, but be able to generate from previous purchase patterns designs that are
they are more likely to like; that is, generate designs within the envelope of
consumer preference.

Before mass production a wide variety of designs emerged from the craft tradition, and it evolved. Only mass production created a fetish about  a single representation of design. We take a genetic view of design – in that we look at designs as belonging to families, as biologist do.
 
FTP: Can you go a bit in depth about the technical side of the design process? Can the potential customer influence the design process? If so, how much?

SK: We think that designers have a new role. That is to create genetic representations of designs rather than a single instance of it. Once this representation is made, we use genoform to create 1000s of variations, but many of them may be not manufacturerable or desirable. We leave it to the designer to use their expert judgment and taste to set the bounds of variations.

The buyer then selects within such bounds. One just One is a designers brand – and we believe that a good part of design is about selection.Evolutionary biologist would agree with us here. So the role of the designer is critical here. But unlike before within a larger range of design possibilities buyers may choose according to their own taste.

We are not in favor of customers designing. The rest of the 3D printing community may be into that, but we are not. We belive that the next generation of designers have a role to give designs form and meaning but gentic form not static immutable form.
 
FTP: You are getting your starting capital through a kickstarter campaign. What are your plans for the future if the business model heads off?

SK: We have set a very small maximum amount of 3000$ and a maximum number of products to 400 – which we can meet. I am a great believer in lean bushiness model and not wish to subject this little venture to the trauma that capital brings. Yet we need to raise some amout of capital. The less investment we have the more we can share with out design community. Out intention is to make it the most attractive platform for the most enlighten and talented designers who are willing to take leaps that others cannot contemplate.

How we are going to do this, I really do not know.

FTP: Thanks a lot for the interview, Sivam! I am sure you do already have some ideas how to approach these rather ambitious goals and I am looking forward to keep our readers updated about its future development.

More Information about One Just One can be found on their official website as well as from their ongoing kickstarter campaign.

22 10, 2012

Featured Companies from the MC500 (Part 19): Beaniebees: Custom Shirts, Sweatters, Ties, Bags…

By | 2018-06-14T06:50:15+00:00 Oktober 22nd, 2012|MC/OI on the Web, MC500, Personalization|

MC500_Signet_2012In our series of postings introducing companies that performend very well in our Customization 500 study, we are introducing the next mass customizer. Remember:  The order of these feature postings is more or less randomly!

 

Today: Nice Idea, Slightly Limited Solution Space

Personalized fashion is a great way to express yourself. It's also very well suited to add a touch of "I really though about it" to any gift you give. And especially for children it's a good opportunity to break out of the usual spiderman-look.

Amongst others, German online-customizer Beaniebee has exactly that approach covered for you. Offering fairly easy personalization of everything from t-shirts for kids and adults, ties, sweathsirts, bags, even teddy bears.

Their easy to use configurator lets you place both custom text and images on your product of choice, however – and this is where I find the process to be lacking – the amount of images that they offer is relatively limited. There are some theme groups like animals, seasons and so on but each one has a fairly small number of actual images, and the ones availible are often not too creative.

Of course, you can upload your own photo to place on your child's new t-shirt. But from a technical point of view, their configuration space could have contained a little more diversity.

Beaniebee 
Note: Please see this post for detailed information on how to interpret the above data.

19 10, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Full Agenda and Additional Information Released

By | 2018-06-14T06:50:18+00:00 Oktober 19th, 2012|Crowdsourcing, Customization Trends, Events, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Wrapping up our previous posts and adding a lot of extra information about this year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar, the full agenda has just been approved for release! 

You can download this year's Smart Customization Seminar's agenda here!

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!

16 10, 2012

MIT Smart Customization Seminar 2012: Session 4: Making, Open Hardware, User Entrepreneurship

By | 2018-06-14T06:50:21+00:00 Oktober 16th, 2012|Crowdsourcing, Customization Trends, Events, Personalization|

Seminar-banner-2012-01 Conitnuing our little mini series on year's MIT Smart Customization Seminar's agenda,  it's all about user design and making, and the tools to be successful at it:

Session 4: December 4th, 3:45pm – 5:00pm
Making, Open Hardware, User Entrepreneurship

Designing and making is no longer only done by experts with years of training.

Many of the digital design tools that were once available to professionals are now in the hands of consumers. Desktop 3D printers are popping up everywhere, sophisticated design software is freely available online, and the boundary between physical and digital is quickly blurring.

What is being made by these non-experts? How are they designing and making it? What new design processes are we finding with such easily accessible design tools? From the bottom up – including start-ups, DIY fabricators and at-home designers; and from the top down – software behemoths and construction giants, we are seeing dramatic transformations in design technologies and platforms that enable mass customized products like never before.

For more up-to-date information and registration please head to http://scg.mit.edu or follow the conference twitter hashtag, #SCG12!